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Seller's Guide to A Home Inspection

The buyer has requested permission to arrange for a home inspection. So what should the seller do? First of all, a home inspection is a very realistic request, so be agreeable. Work out a date and time that works for all involved.

How to get ready for the inspection:

10 Points of Interest

The buyer has requested permission to arrange for a home inspection. So what should the seller do? First of all, a home inspection is a very realistic request, so be agreeable. Work out a date and time that works for all involved.

How to get ready for the inspection

10 Points of Interest

1.    Ensure the home is clean.

This is not only inviting to the prospective buyer and his inspector, but a clean home implies a well maintained home.

2.    Be ready on time.

If the inspection is booked for 9am, be ready for 9am. Often the inspector will be a little early, as they usually start on the exterior. An unexpected visitor in your back yard may be alarming if you are unprepared.

3.    Remove yourself from the area.

Often the buyer will accompany the home inspector (this is encouraged) but buyers may feel uncomfortable about asking questions while the owner is present. Try to leave the home or at least be out of the way, and impartial to the inspection. Your presence is not required for this process. If the inspector has questions for you, they will be asked upon entry of the home.

Keep kids and pets occupied. If pets cannot be removed from the area, perhaps a pet carrier will help ensure the pet is not interfering with the inspection process. Inspections can take approximately 3hrs from start to finish.

4.    Ensure all services are on.

The inspector will be required to turn on and inspect all appliances, run the dishwasher, test the furnace and air conditioning systems. This can prove to be very difficult in vacant homes if the services are shut off. If there are no services at the time of inspection, it will cause delays and re-scheduling problems, and will also create delays in your ability to close the sale.

5.    Furnace and hot water heaters.

Remove any storage items that may be blocking access to a full investigation of the furnace, hot water heater, and air conditioning systems.

This is not a recommended storage area at any given time, but if a surplus of items has found their way to these areas, clear away at least 3 to 4 feet of workspace.

6.    Ensure pilot lights are lit.

Most home inspectors are not willing to light pilot lights. They are not covered for that form of liability. Without these items being properly lit, the inspection cannot be done on these systems. This will cause a delay in the inspection, and a new appointment may have to be rescheduled if you cannot light them yourself.

7.    Provide documents and permits.

Provide the proper permits and documentation required for any repairs or additions done to the home. Invoices for roofing, remodeling products, or electrical and plumbing repairs will assist in areas to have a quick look at. Having these areas checked by the inspector will enhance the peace of mind of the buyer and build confidence in the prospective home.

8.    Attic access.

Access to the attic space is necessary to inspect the insulation factor and search for any moisture damage. Ensure that a clear path is available for access.

9.    Access to outbuildings and garages.

Access to these buildings is also included if these buildings are included in the sale. If you are unable to leave keys, then remove the locks prior to the inspection.

Underground sprinkler systems and exterior electrical boxes may also apply to the "have a key available" rule.

10.    Exterior access.

This can be an issue, especially during the winter months. A courtesy trail through the snow would be greatly appreciated by the inspector. Also, in the summer, trashcans, woodpiles, and excess storage leaning against the house should be removed in order to inspect the complete exterior of the home. This also helps eliminate any uncertainties or possibilities of hidden defects, creating buyer security and peace of mind.

Keep kids and pets occupied. If pets cannot be removed from the area, perhaps a pet carrier will help ensure the pet is not interfering with the inspection process. Inspections can take approximately 3hrs from start to finish.

11. Ensure all services are on.

The inspector will be required to turn on and inspect all appliances, run the dishwasher, test the furnace and air conditioning systems. This can prove to be very difficult in vacant homes if the services are shut off. If there are no services at the time of inspection, it will cause delays and re-scheduling problems, and will also create delays in your ability to close the sale.

Furnace and hot water heaters.

Remove any storage items that may be blocking access to a full investigation of the furnace, hot water heater, and air conditioning systems.

This is not a recommended storage area at any given time, but if a surplus of items has found their way to these areas, clear away at least 3 to 4 feet of workspace.
Ensure pilot lights are lit.

Most home inspectors are not willing to light pilot lights. They are not covered for that form of liability. Without these items being properly lit, the inspection cannot be done on these systems. This will cause a delay in the inspection, and a new appointment may have to be rescheduled if you cannot light them yourself.

  1. Provide documents and permits.

Provide the proper permits and documentation required for any repairs or additions done to the home. Invoices for roofing, remodeling products, or electrical and plumbing repairs will assist in areas to have a quick look at. Having these areas checked by the inspector will enhance the peace of mind of the buyer and build confidence in the prospective home.

  1. Attic access.

Access to the attic space is necessary to inspect the insulation factor and search for any moisture damage. Ensure that a clear path is available for access.

  1. Access to outbuildings and garages.

Access to these buildings is also included if these buildings are included in the sale. If you are unable to leave keys, then remove the locks prior to the inspection.

Underground sprinkler systems and exterior electrical boxes may also apply to the "have a key available" rule.